Polygon

God of War is the story of a dad who can't stop screwing up

Philip Kollar
 

Sony Santa Monica makes Kratos come to terms with his own terrible choices If you watched the debut of Sony's new God of War earlier this week, you've probably already formed a fairly strong image of what the game is like. For example, you'll know that it stars a big, muscly bearded character who appears to be Kratos, the recognizable protagonist from the series' past. And you'll know that Kratos appears to be caring for a young child. During a demo of the game at E3 2016, God of War creative director Cory Barlog confirmed that the young boy in the game is Kratos' son.

And yes, that is the same Kratos from the previous half-dozen games in the series, although he is now voiced by Stargate SG-1's Christopher Judge instead of T. C. Carson. Despite the clean naming convention, God of War is a continuation of the series' story, and it takes place after the events of God of War 3.

Oh, and also, yes: This is a game about fatherhood. This is a game about fatherhood In particular, God of War is a story about a father who has made a million mistakes, who has consistently made the wrong choices in life. Rather than accepting responsibility for those choices, he has lashed out in anger at everyone around him. That would be Kratos, our "hero.

" This isn't Kratos' first family — he was tricked into killing his wife and daughter earlier in the series — but the developers said they're not revealing the name of Kratos' son or the boy's mother because those bits of information are important to the game's plot. While Barlog is staying quiet on how Kratos got from the deadly finale of God of War 3 to the more relaxed opening of God of War, he said there's an important thematic reason he wanted to continue this story rather than reboot the series. "I feel like Kratos' origin story has been told," Barlog said to Polygon. "That was the Greek era.

And when I started imagining this full game, I started seeing this massive timeline come out and realizing the Greek era of games was just the beginning of the character. " Barlog compared it to seasons of a TV show like Arrow. The…

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